http://www.healthordisease.com svs-games.com

Welcome to our blog page. Each month we’ll be stepping into the world of a different Peak District Artisan, looking and their styles of work and what inspires them.

28th July, 2016

This month we’re meeting Casey Allum

10801784_10204482312649565_4254666285094791436_n

Where are you from/based now?

I’m from The Langdale Valley, Lake District and now based in Brailsford, Derbyshire.  


Tell us about your work

I draw fine pencil work with a crisp contemporary edge.


Can you describe how and why your career as an artist began?

I always wanted to be an artist, for as long as I can remember. I studied art throughout school and through A-Level but didn’t take it any further as I couldn’t stand the ‘box ticking’ process that went with it. Everyone’s work looked the same; it was as though you had to be a certain type of artist to get the grades. So after years of working in business and sales it finally clicked, like switching on a light bulb one day and I knew it was a now or never situation so I went for it… I quit my job, drummed up a few commissions and sat in my tiny little studio drawing solidly for months creating the limited edition print and card range and that’s where it all started, three years ago. I’m now a mainly commissioned based artist, now booked up until June2017. I sell my prints and cards to galleries up and down the country, even abroad and I also illustrate for books and commercial works.


How long have you been a member of PDA?

I’m a new member to the PDA. I moved down to Derbyshire last year and looked for an art group to be involved with and found the PDA. I was immediately bowled over by the diversity and talent throughout the group, so was ecstatic to be accepted after my interview in October.


What do you think people see in your work - what draws them to it?

I look to create a lot of light for the subjects in my works, so that they can breathe and have the space any living creature needs to be content in life. In term, I hope that this draws the eye of the beholder to the actual details in the subject, the textures, the finer details, the movements and characteristics that are sometimes lost with complicated compositions. The negative space I use in my work is a real source of controversy but it certainly catches the eye, especially to those who understand my goal.


What / who inspires you? Is there anyone specific that inspires you – either from the arts world, or on a personal level?

I’ve been inspired by many people and artists throughout my journey so far but on a completely unrelated artistic level. I continue to be inspired daily by my Mother, who is certainly not an artist but a formidable business woman. She keeps me grounded, even if I don’t want to be! She has worked extremely hard all her life to be where she is. We are polar opposites but we do connect on a self-employed level and I truly admire her dedication and strength, I don’t think I’d have mustard up the courage to become a full-time artist without looking at what she has achieved in her business.


What’s your typical working environment?

Lots of music….my taste is massively diverse, just so long as there’s something playing around me, I’m happy. My studio is light and (mostly) organised, it itself is a blank canvas which I find keeps my head clear and undistracted so that I can focus on my work.


Do you have a favourite or defining moment during your career as an artist? Can you describe it?

This year I was asked to participate in the 150th Beatrix Potter Exhibition up in The Lake District as an artist who is inspired by her. Growing up in The Lakes I was surrounded by wildlife and the stunning landscapes that Beatrix drew a lot of her inspiration from. I copied her work when I was young, playing with characters and animal illustrations which obviously is now prominent in my work. It was a huge honour to be approached for this and I was delighted to enter four large original drawings for the exhibition which is on at the Kendal Museum until mid-October.



26th June, 2016

This month we’re meeting Keith Wright

Keith Wright

Where are you from/based now?

I was born in Nottingham, and I'm now based in Long Eaton


Tell us about your work

I create images using photomontage inspired by natural and man-made surface textures.  


Can you describe how and why your career as an artist began?

I studied commercial photography in the 1980’s but this never really developed into a career. I have always been interested in design and when I met my wife (PDA member Justine Nettleton) art and design was a shared interest and I developed the confidence to use my photography to create artworks.


How long have you been a member of PDA?

I joined the group in October 2012


What’s the greatest benefit of being a PDA member?

It's helped introduce me to a whole new market of customers and being associated with such high-quality artists has inspired me to ‘raise my game’  


What do you think people see in your work – what draws them to it?

My photographs are more like abstract designs. They don’t necessarily look like photographs at first viewing. I think people are interested to find out what the images actually are and how they are done. I always provide a back story of where and when I collected the original images which most people seem to find interesting.


Where do you see yourself in the future?

I want to continue to develop my work and hone my style. I hope to continue with the PDA and use the opportunities that arise from being a member. My next step is to use galleries to sell my work as well as the PDA shows.  


What / who inspires you? Is there anyone specific that inspires you – either from the arts world, or on a personal level?

My wife Justine is a great inspiration, her creativity, innovation and work ethic is both an inspiration and a challenge! Luckily I never feel in competition and she is very supportive of my work. Recently I have discovered the brand of Miho Unexpected Things home design and wall art. I really like their graphical quirky approach.



23rd May, 2016

This month we’re meeting Justine Nettleton

Screen Shot 2016-05-23 at 12.15.52

Where are you from/based now?

Long Eaton


About your work

I am a painter, jewellery maker, printer. My paintings, collages and prints are inspired by landscape, light, weather and trees. I make jewellery using the colours and textures in my paintings and prints and take inspiration from the natural world.


Can you describe how and why your career as an artist began?

As a teenager I loved making things. I made my own clothes and loved trying out new techniques. I printed my own fabric, made odd sculptures out of twigs and mud, collected weird objects like dead moles. I went to collage initially to be a textile artist but found the Fine Art people to be cooler. I did a Fine Art Degree and specialised in the male nude which was an unexpected benefit of the course. After collage I worked as a primary school teacher and did some really creative projects with the kids. I thought teaching would give me time to do my own work and it did to a certain extent but coming up with new projects for the classroom used too much of my creative energy. I gave up teaching and now just do my own work.


How long have you been a member of PDA?

I’ve been a PDA member for about three years now.


What’s the greatest benefit of being a PDA member?

Members of the PDA are all professional artists. I have learned a lot from other members and have been really impressed by their approach to their work and how they take it out to the public. They have built up good reputations and are very generous with their knowledge and experience. The skills of the members are wide and the quality of the work is very high.


Where do you see yourself in the future?

My work is always developing. I believe if you are working on your art new inspiration and ideas will constantly flow. Picasso said “Inspiration exists, but it has to find you working.”  I’m always trying out new ideas and techniques. Sometimes they are disastrous but after sleeping on it I can use what I have learned to make something successful, sometimes it can take weeks, months years before I come back to an idea. I go on courses regularly to learn new techniques and this year I have enjoyed using silversmith techniques to produce a higher end range of jewellery. I never stick with just one discipline as I believe they all feed into each other. Plus, I like to have a range of areas I can work on. Therefore, if I fall out with my painting I can go and play with my jewellery for a while.


What’s your typical working environment?

My working environment is everywhere I go. I have a studio, a shed, a dining table, a utility room, a car! I like to make and create all day long and fit my environment around my creativity. In my studio I do messy painting, on my dining table I make bags from my own printed fabric and in my utility room and shed are pieces of jewellery at various stages of development. I also use a computer to create collages and my iPhone is essential for collecting inspiration. My husband has learned to be very understanding of my ‘creative clutter’.  


As an artist, what challenges do you face and how do you overcome them?

Time management is a big one for me. I run 3 businesses and have to make time for my family too. I have jewellery orders going out every week. Sometimes it becomes a production line and you wonder how it all happened. Making the same items over and over again can be the antithesis of being an artist. For me being an artist is like being an inventor. I want to create something totally new and I get a buzz from doing that every day. I have to manage my time to give me that essential creativity time. Time for just daydreaming and playing with materials, ideas and images.




http://nosubhealth.com